Arthur C Clarke Award Submissions

The list of submissions by publishers for the Arthur C Clarke award has been announced and can be found here. 

Below is a bar chart of the all those publishers who have submitted 3 or more novels split up by author gender.

Slide1

I would expect about a third of the novels to be by females to reflect the typical ratio of two novels by male authors for every novel by a female author that is submitted to agents and publishers.

There is the caveat of the smaller the number of novels, the more variation from the ratio you would expect by the laws of statistics.

Even so, there is a bit of difference. Bloomsbury with all its three novels written by women contrasted with Snowbooks with all its six novels written by men. Other out of expectation publishers include Solaris with only one in six of its novels written by a female, and Gollancz with only three out its thirteen (23.1%) written by females. On the other side of the coin we have Elsewhen Press with three out of four novels written by females and Jo Feltcher Books with three out of five novels being written by females.

Overall in the statistics shown, there are twenty-five novels written by females as opposed to fifty-one by males – roughly in line with the expected ratio.

This is a small sample size, and therefore has to be viewed cautiously. But it does ring a few alarm bells with me. Why do we have to have such a wide variation in the ratios? Or putting it another way, why do Bloomsbury, Elsewhen Press and Jo Fletcher Books have to counteract the likes of Snowbooks, Solaris and Gollancz? Some of these biases have been seen in previous years. See below for a previous graph I did for 2014 Arthur C Clarke Award submissions. [I didn’t go through last year’s list before anyone asks.]

Slide1

I’ll leave you to make what you will of these numbers.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s